> our title:

US Air Force Releases Predator, Reaper Accident Reports

> original title:

MQ-1B Predator Accident Report Released

(Source: US Air Force Air Combat Command; issued June 10, 2016)


JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Va. --- Three substantially contributing factors caused the crash of an MQ-1B Predator operating in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility, April 28, 2015, according to an Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today.

The board president found, by a preponderance of evidence, that improper frequency selection, degradation of the ground data terminal transmitter output, and a delay of critical action procedures were substantially contributing factors to the mishap. The aircraft was operated by personnel from the 20th Reconnaissance Squadron, Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri. Total losses are estimated at $4.66 million. No injuries, deaths or damages to private property were reported.

The investigation notes the mishap pilot failed to switch from the default frequency to the assigned operating frequency which, when combined with other transmitters operating in the area, created a cluttered frequency environment. Immediately following take-off, the aircraft lost sufficient uplink signal and was not responsive to commands. Negative habit transfer indicated the mishap sensor operator was slow to execute critical action procedures.

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MQ-9A Reaper Accident Investigation Report Released

(Source: US Air Force Air Combat Command; issued June 10, 2016)

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Va --- On May 5, 2015, a failed component driver caused the crash of an MQ-9A Reaper operating in the U.S. Africa Command area of responsibility, according to an Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today.

The board president found, by a preponderance of evidence, that the cause of the mishap was a failed nosewheel servo driver that resulted in the inability of the recovery crew to safely maintain runway heading after landing.

The loss of nosewheel servo inhibited functionality of the steering controller, which not only prevented the nosewheel from auto centering back to its neutral position, but also prevented the pilot’s ability to control the nosewheel steering through the rudder.

The aircraft was assigned to the 432nd Wing, from Creech Air Force Base, Nevada and operated by personnel assigned to the 33rd Expeditionary Special Operations Squadron, 435th Air Ground Operations Wing, 17th Expeditionary Air Force. The aircraft sustained extensive damage and the wreckage was recovered with no reported fatalities, injuries or damage to civilian property. The damage to U.S. government property totaled $6.70 million.

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